Even if you don’t live in Asia, there’s a pretty good chance that you will see some Chinese New Year celebrations happening in the city near you starting on Tuesday (5th February). Here in Malaysia, Chinese New Year celebrations are important as there is a big Chinese community. But what does Chinese New Year consist of really?

During this annual event, people celebrate the start of a new year according to the Chinese calendar, a chronology said to have started somewhere between 800 and 400 BC. Chinese New Year is part of a bigger celebration called Spring Festival, starting on the 23rd day of the Lunar months and lasting for 23 days.

Based on a 12-year cycle, every year is associated with a different zodiac sign among the 12 animals of the Chinese mythology – Rat, Ox, Tiger, Rabbit, Dragon, Snake, Horse, Sheep, Monkey, Rooster, Dog and Pig.

This year, the Pig takes the place of honor and people born in – 1935, 1947, 1959, 1971, 1983, 1995, 2007, 2019 – will be celebrated.

According to Mirror.co.uk,‘Pigs are the twelfth sign in the zodiac and are seen as independent, sincere, loyal and decisive, who aren’t afraid of difficulties in life. Due to these characteristics, they also enjoy harmonious relationships with those around them.’

The celebrations usually include watching traditional dances, lighting firecrackers, ringing bells and decorating houses with red banners, lanterns and paintings.

With Chinese New Year being the longest public holiday, it is a favorable time for families to spend time together. “Lucky money” is given to children in red envelopes. However, with the digital age, even traditions evolve and red envelope apps – where people can receive cyber money- were created.

On New Year’s Day, as the tradition requires, families clean houses and sweep away bad fortune. In the evening, they gather for a dinner reunion and eat traditional dishes such as spring rolls, noodles, dumplings, fish and chicken. Served at the start of a banquet, Lo Hei is a dish that has become a popular choice for many people during Chinese New Year. When the final countdown approaches, families light up firecrackers to signal the end of last year and the beginning of next.

This is a bright and cheerful time of the year, so Happy Chinese New Year from the LuxTag® family to you!

 

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